FUDCon Paris 2012 – review

This year was time for a beloved city to host our annual FUDCon in EMEA. A beloved city with a great community which organized an awesome FUDCon!

This FUDCon had everything and I mean everything!

Marketing, awesome presentations, technical presentations and workshops, swag production (yeah!) and a lot of brainstorming hackfests!

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MozCamp Europe 2012 video, photos, review

It’s been a month since MozCamp in Warsaw and I am really happy that I am finally available to write a blogpost!

I always enjoy attending awesome events regarding open source along with brilliant people such as MozCamp, FudCon, Fosdem etc.

MozCamp was definitely one of them especially dude to the fact that I had the chance to chat and brainstorm with a lot of smart people around the world. Everyone was interested to get know you, to learn what are you up to and help you where ever they could.

When I find some I will publish some more detailed blogposts regarding some special topics on MozCamp such as Firefox OS, WebMaker and Mozilla Reps.

Till then, enjoy the Firefox dance at the closing speech on Sunday and my set of photos on picasa.

 

MozCamp Europe 2012 Warsaw – Firefox closing dance from Christos Bacharakis on Vimeo.

Thank you Mozilla 🙂

 

Create your first Web Application

This blog pos is refereed on a session which  I run in OpenSUSE collaboration camp 2012 with the title:”The Web is the Platform : Web Applications” and around 30 attendants.

In this session I had the chance to present what is a Web Application, why to build a WebApp and how to do it.

After explaining the benefits of creating and using WebApps online and off line, we explored some cool new features that HTML5 brings along with some of the revolutionary WebAPIs that Mozilla develops.

That was the time to dive into WebApps and take a look in the process of creating a Web Application. For those who don’t know, creating a web application is a really simple process which can be described in 2 steps.

Imagine that you have a “site” where you provide some services and you want to transform it into a WebApp. The only thing you have to do is to create the Manifest which is a file with all WebApp’s details regarding the developer, where is hosted, the languages which are supported and more.

In Mozilla’s developer network you can find a detailed guide on how to write your WebApp’s manifest.

The next step is to create an “installation” page for your webapp. This page can present some basic information regarding the webapp, reviews, critics and a “install” button for installing the webapp in your browser/device. The “install” button has a simple and clear Javascript code which calls the webapp’s Manifest.

Unfortunately web applications can not be installed in Linux based operating systems because all the different architectures that every operating system has. Mozilla foundation is working on that problem and I’m pretty sure that problem is going to be solved in the near future. MacOS is fully supports web applications instead of Windows where you have to perform some actions in order to install your web application.

Additionally Mozilla is working on a Marketplace where all Web Applications will be hosted along with reviews, screen shots, users feedback and a lot of new features.

As you see creating a Web Application is a pretty simple and easy task. The feedback from the session was very positive with a lot of people showing interest on messing with WebApps. The presentation file can be found here, but due to the fact that it was something like a workshop, the slides are a generic.

Enjoy and don’t forget that “The Web is the Platform”. 😉

Mozilla B2G: Bringing the Open Web to mobile devices

This blog post is refereed on a session which  I run in OpenSUSE collaboration camp 2012 with the title:”Mozilla B2G:Bringing the Open Web to mobile devices ” and had around 20 attendants.

Firefox OS is really known these days as Mozilla’s operating system but nobody knows that under the hood is Mozilla Boot to Gecko.

In my presentation I had the opportunity to explain what is B2G, to present it’s internals and it’s three sub projects Gonk, Gecko, Gaia.

Gonk is the bottom layer of B2G which is responsible for the communication between BG2’s upper layer (Gecko) and device’s hardware. It’s consists a small Linux kernel, with some Android libraries and it’s 100% Open source.

The middle layer of B2G is called Gecko, the known graphics engine which is brought in Firefox too. As you can see, B2G is nothing more than a Firefox in a mobile device.

The top leyer which is the User Interface of B2G is called Gaia and delivers all the revolutionary technologies such as HTML5, WebAPIs and more. Gaia is pure HTML5, JavaScript and CSS which makes it a really easy to edit and hack. Everything is a Web Application in Gaia, even the SMS app. Due to the fact that there are no APIs in HTML5 to make a call, send an sms etc, Mozilla is working on WebAPIs where you will able to control your device writing only pure HTML5 code.

Explaining Mozilla Boot to Gecko in theory is good, presenting it live in a device is AWESOME!

That’s the feedback I received from the audience where they had the chance to play with a Nexus S B2G device. Everyone was impressed and wanted to learn more regarding the mechanisms under the hood such as Gecko and WebAPIs.

I am pretty sure that Mozilla boot to gecko is going to be hacked by a lot of Greek hackers! 😉

Are you interested on hacking Mozilla B2G or Gaia? Visit the project’s hacking page. 😉

Here you can find the presentation file with a lot of details regarding the status and future plans of Firefox OS.

Enjoy 🙂